Get Involved

We all can do our part in helping our young people achieve their dreams. Get involved with MBK Ohio and stay informed about our work.

MBK Ohio will work with advocates to help Ohio’s MBK communities set short and long term goals with measurable benchmarks of success. These benchmarks build off of the Six Milestones from the National MBK Alliance.

The Six Milestones

1. Getting a Healthy Start and Entering School Ready to Learn

All children should have a healthy start and enter school ready – cognitively, physically, socially, and emotionally.

2. Reading at Grade Level by Third Grade

All children should be reading at grade level by age 8 – the age at which reading to learn becomes essential.

3. Graduating from High School Ready for College and Career

All youth should receive a quality high school education and graduate with the skills and tools needed to advance to postsecondary education or training.

4. Completing Postsecondary Education or Training

Every American should have the option to attend postsecondary education and receive the education and training needed for the quality jobs of today and tomorrow.

5. Successfully Entering the Workforce

Anyone who wants a job should be able to get a job that allows them to support themselves and their families.

6. Keeping Kids on Track and Giving Them Second Chances

All youth and young adults should be safe from violent crime; and individuals who are confined should receive the education, training, and treatment they need for a second chance.

President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper Task Force also identified the following cross-cutting strategies that also remain core principles to our work:

  • Enabling comprehensive, cradle-to-college-and-career community solutions;
  • Learning from and doing what works;
  • Making data about critical life indicators more transparent; and
  • Empowering parents and engaging other caring adults

Join the Movement

Sign up to support MBK Ohio and stay informed about our work!

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