The Kirwan Institute

The US economy has been structured by rules that either privilege or exploit people based on their race. Our nation’s legacy of implicit and explicit racial exclusions continue to have a deep impact on who is able to meaningfully participate and profit in the current American economy and who is left behind.
 
The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the federal agency for volunteering and service, has awarded the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity a three-year grant of more than $450,000 for 10 AmeriCorps VISTA members to support the work of My Brother’s Keeper Ohio (MBK Ohio).
 
Kirwan’s own Lena Tenney was featured in the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators NASFAA Annual Impact Report. Click here to read the article, titled “did they really just say that?!”  
 
The Kirwan Institute would like to thank our partners, funders and collaborators for their support of our work over the last 15 years.
 
The opiate epidemic is creating a new conversation around drug policy and criminal reform efforts across the country. Opioid related overdose deaths have hit a critical point and have begun to reach traditionally unaffected communities. As communities wrestle with overburdened jails and prisons and insufficient mental health and drug treatment facilities, policymakers and the public are challenging the strategy of criminalization utilized during the last 40 years of the War on Drugs.
 
By Jonathan Branfman PhD Candidate & Instructor in Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies
 
“Oooooo his hair is like mine,” I heard a wide-eyed, mahogany-skin faced little boy whisper to his friend as I passed them. His words eased some of my anxiety as I entered an unfamiliar school, in an unfamiliar state, with an unfamiliar task, that often felt unattainable. As a way to end the school-to-prison pipeline, I was to coordinate a mentoring research program for the “at-risk” Black male students at a low-income serving elementary school. I knew a major reason I had gotten the position was because I was a Black male, but I knew that would not be enough.
 
The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity announces the nation’s first free and publicly available online implicit bias module series tailored specifically toward K-12 Educators. The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity at The Ohio State University is proud to announce the nation’s first free and publicly available online implicit bias module series tailored specifically toward K–12 educators.
 
A letter from Executive Vice President and Provost Bruce A. McPheron, PhD Dear Colleagues, I write to announce that Darrick Hamilton, PhD, has accepted our offer to serve as the executive director of the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity. Subject to approval by the Board of Trustees, his appointment is effective January 1, 2019.
 
Mapping the Policy Landscape and Equity Impact At the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity, our research and engagement supports the mission of ensuring that all people and communities have the opportunity to succeed. This call to promote opportunities for future success is never more important than within our education systems. As a society, we must look to policies and practices that can support our youngest citizens and support families that are most in need.
 
Institutional Interventions to Prevent Implicit Bias from Undermining Organizational Diversity In support of the The Columbus Commitment: Achieving Pay Equity, launched by the Columbus Women’s Commission and focused on the issue of the gender pay gap, the Kirwan Institute presents our latest report Institutional Interventions to Prevent Implicit Bias from Under
 
Recent Article Highlights Suspension Disparity An article recently released from The Blade demonstrates that black students are suspended more often than classmates. Read the entire article here, then come back to check out the interactive map below.
 
COLUMBUS, OH – During the recent 2018 Leadership Summit hosted by Ohio State Extension, Shannon Ginther, First Lady and Chair of the Columbus Women’s Commission, recognized the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity for its applied research in areas of equity. Regarding Kirwan as a “gem” at Ohio State, Ginther acknowledged the Institute’s potential to act as a leader at the University, encouraging more initiatives that address the current disparities in Columbus.
 
By Kip Holley In 2008, then presidential candidate Barack Obama brought forth a new group of voters to the polls. These voters—primarily made up of women of color and those living in poverty—helped to propel him to the presidency in 2008 and to re-election four years later.
 
Renewing Our Call to Action responds to the October 2015 Youth Perspective Report completed by the City of Columbus to support their expanding work in the My Brother’s Keeper Initiative.