Rose Colored Glasses for Race: Unwarranted Optimism in Whites’ Views of Racial Gaps

Although past and present racial gaps have been well-documented by social scientists and social justice advocates, relatively little is known about the degree of correspondence between the reality of racial gaps and naïve perceptions thereof. The correspondence between perceptions and reality is important because gap assessments have been empirically linked to socially harmful racial ideologies, racial group attitudes, and racial policy attitudes.

Rose Colored Glasses for Race: Unwarranted Optimism in Whites’ Views of Racial Gaps

Talking Productively About Race in the Colorblind Era

It is the year 2015. Slavery in the United States has been formally prohibited by the Federal Government for approximately 150 years. The landmark decision in Brown vs. the Board of Education recently turned 60, and race-based affirmative action was ordered into existence by Lyndon Johnson approximately 50 years ago.

Talking Productively About Race in the Colorblind Era

Greater Columbus Infant Mortality Task Force: Final Report and Recommendations

Download the full report (PDF) Infant mortality rates are a globally accepted measure of a community’s well-being. And, while Columbus is widely considered to be one of our nation’s more prosperous, well-educated and progressive communities, we have one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country. Consider: Every week in Franklin County, more than … Continue reading »

Greater Columbus Infant Mortality Task Force: Final Report and Recommendations

Infant Mortality in Ohio

Download the Kirwan Issue Brief: Infant Mortality in Ohio (PDF) Infant mortality is the rate at which babies die within their first year of life. Infant mortality is a measure that can be used to gauge the trends in women and child health, the quality and availability of medical care, public health practices, and the … Continue reading »

Infant Mortality in Ohio

Issue Brief Reveals that Unconscious Bias Permeates Through School Discipline

Alarming disparities in the application of school discipline policies exist nationwide between African American, Latino and White students. A “2009-2010 survey of 72,000 schools (K-12) shows that while Black students make up only 18 percent of those enrolled in the schools sampled, they accounted for 35 percent of those suspended once, 46 percent of those … Continue reading »

Issue Brief Reveals that Unconscious Bias Permeates Through School Discipline