2017 State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review

The release of the 2017 State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review comes at a very important time. More than ever, Kirwan and our partners in equity work can see the importance of how we shape the narrative of race and equity in this country. For the last five years, the State of the Science … Continue reading »

2017 State of the Science: Implicit Bias Review

The Subprime and Foreclosure Crisis: Ten Years Later

The Work of Financial Justice is as Important as Ever This past month marked the ten year anniversary of the onset of the Great Recession. Beginning in September 2007, and continuing at a breathtaking pace, Lehman Brothers collapsed, setting off a chain reaction during which American International Group (AIG) came to the brink of failure, … Continue reading »

The Subprime and Foreclosure Crisis: Ten Years Later

Active Bystander Training: Tune into the Livestream

The Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and Ethnicity is proud to present its first ever Active Bystander Training. Facilitated by Researcher and Facilitation Specialist Lena Tenney, the training is a collaborative effort between The Ohio State University’s College of Engineering; College of Arts and Sciences; College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences; and the … Continue reading »

Active Bystander Training: Tune into the Livestream

Brown seeks ideas on keeping Charlottesville from happening in Ohio

By Mary Schlanden, Columbus Dispatch For ethnic and religious minorities, American culture hasn’t always been welcoming. Earlier this month, they got a painful reminder when they turned on the televisions to see Klansmen and neo-Nazis marching in a torch-lit parade and chanting anti-Semitic slogans. Eventually one of their number ran his car into a crowd … Continue reading »

Brown seeks ideas on keeping Charlottesville from happening in Ohio

Google memo completely misses how implicit biases harm women

By E. Anne York, The Conversation Workplace biases are back in the national conversation, thanks to the recent memo by a Google employee. The memo’s author challenges the company’s diversity policies, arguing that psychological differences between men and women explain why fewer women work in tech. He also minimizes the effect that unconscious biases have … Continue reading »

Google memo completely misses how implicit biases harm women